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The Murder of Betty Gail Brown, part 1 (2018)

Mariam interviews Wayne Johnson, librarian and local historian about the murder of Transylvania University student Betty Gail Brown in October 1961. In the first episode, Wayne and Mariam discuss the events leading up to the crime.

Episode #: 

5

Duration: 

00:19:40

Other Recent Episodes: 

The Urge to Merge: The Merger of Lexington’s City and Fayette County’s Governments (2021)

October 1st, 2021

<p>Mariam and Wayne discuss the history of Lexington &amp; Fayette County’s merged governments, one of only fifteen merged city-county governments in the United States. They discuss how and why the merger was planned, how it was enacted, and briefly touch on Lexington’s famous mayoral race, known as the “Spider Election”, of 1973.</p>

Russell’s Cave: A Tiny History for Fayette County’s Biggest Cave (2021)

August 31st, 2021

<p>Jamie tells an abridged history of Russell’s Cave, Fayette County’s largest cave, including a description of the area, evidence of Native American’s habitation of the land, Colonel William Russell’s military grant of the land including the cave, and our favorite event: the Cassius Marcellus Clay fight with Samuel Brown at a political rally. </p>

Not Just a One Way Street (2021)

July 30th, 2021

<p>Mariam and Wayne discuss the construction of New Circle Road, the transition of the downtown streets to one way, and other major transportation projects in Lexington. (You might notice some light construction noise after the 25-minute mark - there were renovations happening on the floor above us, our apologies!) An image of Main Street while it was still two-way is available on the Kentucky Photo Archive <a href="https://kyphotoarchive.com/2017/09/11/last-days-of-two-way-traffic-on-l

The Murder of Alexander T. Hays (2021)

June 30th, 2021

<p>Producer Erin takes a turn on the other side of the mic to tell the story of the unsolved murder of Alexander T. Hays. She explores the coverage of the crime, the investigation, the suspect, and two theories of the 1846 crime. </p>