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Kentucky School for the Deaf

​The Kentucky School for the Deaf, located in Danville, was created in 1822.  The first class of students were admitted beginning in April 1823.  Through a partnership with Centre College, the school's board identified John Adamson Jacobs as a potential instructor for the school and sent him to train at the first school for deaf students in the US, the American School for the Deaf in Hartford, Connecticut.  He served as instructor, principal, and superintendent for KSD during the years from 1825-1869.  Jacobs Hall was built in 1857 and was named for him.  It is classified as a National Historic Landmark and is still in operation as the school's museum today.  From the beginning, KSD was committed to educating students academically while teaching life skills and providing vocational training. Deaf African American students began attending in 1885.
 
The Centennial History provides a detailed account of the formation of the school and its facilities, as well as its evolution through the first 100 years.  Financial structure of the school, methods of instruction, and the creation of the school newspaper and literary society are all discussed.  The book also contains lists of the names of all donors, trustees, commissioners, and students.  Officers of the school, which include superintendents, principals, teachers, and staff have a short biographical summaries accompanying their names.
1907 Kentucky Association for the Deaf
The Kentucky School for the Blind Colored School, ca 1885

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